Posts Tagged ‘Immigration and Customs Enforcement’

Fingerprint sharing led to deportation of 47,000 – Yahoo! News.

By SUZANNE GAMBOA, Associated Press Writer Suzanne Gamboa, Associated Press Writer Tue Aug 10, 7:17 am ET

WASHINGTON – Records show that about 47,000 people have been removed or deported from the U.S. after the Homeland Security Department sifted through 3 million sets of fingerprints taken from bookings at local jails.

About one-quarter of those kicked out of the country did not have criminal records, according to government data obtained by immigration advocacy groups that have filed a lawsuit. The groups plan to release the data Tuesday and provided early copies to The Associated Press.

As issue is a fingerprint-sharing program known as Secure Communities that the government says is focused on getting rid of the “worst of the worst” criminal immigrants from the U.S.

Immigration advocates say that the government instead spends too much time on lower-level criminals or non-criminals.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement divides crimes into three categories, with Level 1 being the most serious. Most of those deported committed Level 2 or 3 crimes or were non-criminals, a monthly report of Secure Communities statistics shows.

“ICE has pulled a bait and switch, with local law enforcement spending more time and resources facilitating the deportations of bus boys and gardeners than murderers and rapists and at considerable cost to local community policing strategies, making us all less safe,” said Peter Markowitz, director of the Immigration Justice Clinic at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in New York.

Markowitz’s clinic, the National Day Laborer Organizers Network and the Center for Constitutional Rights had requested and sued for the statistics. Immigration and Customs Enforcement released some of the documents late Monday.

Richard Rocha, an Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokesman, said non-criminals still may be people who have failed to show up for deportation hearings, who recently crossed the border illegally or who re-entered the country after deportation. He also said it’s important to remember that more people commit crimes that are considered Level 2 and 3.

Secure Communities is “a beneficial partnership tool for ICE and state and local law enforcement agencies helping to identify, prioritize and remove convicted criminal aliens not only from the communities, but also from the country,” Rocha said.

The Obama administration wants Secure Communities operating nationwide by 2013.

As of Aug. 3, 494 counties and local and state agencies in 27 states were sharing fingerprints from jail bookings through the program.

From October 2008 through June of this year, 46,929 people identified through Secure Communities were removed from the U.S., the documents show. Of those, 12,293 were considered non-criminals.

IllegalInAmerica:

Wow, a whopping 12,293 people deported without criminal records.  Of course, these were people that had ‘re-entered’ the country illegally, or ‘recently’ came over.

We need a better system than one that is going to oust over 24% of its deportees only because they are of illegal status, and have not done any criminal activity.  The problem is that I know there are many more criminals out there, in every community both ‘legal’ and ‘illegal’ that we should be focusing our attention on.

Peter Markowitz, thank you for everything you did to get those statistics released from ICE and Secure Communities… it really will show how horrible an immigration filtering system can be, especially when starting out with deporting over a quarter of its deportees for no apparent reason whatsoever… there is way to much hate going on in this country, and I am willing to bet that most of the 12,000 people deported for no reason were only deported because that is all that Secure Communities could capture.

OBAMA – is this true?  You and your administration are backing a system that has deported thousands just for re-entering the country, even though they had probably been here for their whole lives, and were going to visit their friends and family ‘illegally,’ but only because the system is so broken in America that they have to do it ‘illegally.’  When can we change the terms of this agreement with our politicians, and our culture.  It is obviously apparent that at least half of the U.S. agrees with me that something should be done about illegal immigration, and not an automatic deportation of 12,000,000 people.  Give us something to work with here, and quit wasting my time.

IIA

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Immigration detention – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In the United States, a similar practice began in the early 1980s with Haitians and Cubans detained at Guantanamo Bay, and other groups such as Chinese in jails and detention centres on the mainland. The practice was made mandatory by legislation passed in 1996 in response to the Oklahoma City bombing, and has come under criticism from organizations such as Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, Human Rights First, all of whom have released major studies of the subject, and the ACLU [13] About 31,000 non-citizens are held in immigration detention on any given day,[14] including children, in over 200 detention centres, jails, and prisons nationwide.

One of the most recent facilities to open is the T. Don Hutto Residential Center, which opened in 2006 specifically to house non-criminal families. There are other significant facilities in Elizabeth, New Jersey, Oakdale, Louisiana, Florence, Arizona, Miami, Florida, Seattle, York, Pennsylvania, Batavia, New York, Aguadilla, Puerto Rico and all along the TexasMexico border.

About 104 [15] mostly young individuals have died in detention of the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement or shortly afterwards during the five years between 2003 to 2008, and medical neglect may have contributed to 30 of those deaths.[16] On August 6, 2008, 34 year old New Yorker Hiu Lui Ng died in the detention of United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement.[17] The editors of The New York Times condemned the death and urged that the system must be fixed.[18] The Immigration and Customs Enforcement has stated that the number of deaths per capita in detention is dramatically lower for ICE detainees than for U.S. prison and jail populations, that they provide “the best possible healthcare” and that the nation as a whole is “experiencing severe shortages of qualified health professionals”[19] In May 2008 Congress began considering a bill to set new standards for immigrant detainee healthcare.[19]

Children are held in these detention facilities?  Well, that pretty much tells us how much compassion ICE has behind a major factor in our economy.

It comes as no surprise to me that there have been health related issues in these facilities.  Not even actual legalized American citizens can get proper health care… what makes us think that these people would be treated any better?  Is it not better to focus on education and implementing the 12,000,000+ illegal immigrants into our society, that which they are already contributing?  Would it not be better to stop spending money on these types of facilities, and focus on comprehensive programs that will empower people to speak and think freely in America?