Posts Tagged ‘Deportation’

36 arrested in Arizona immigration sweep – KSWT: Local News, Weather, Sports Yuma, AZ El Centro Imperial Valley, CA |.

Associated Press – July 31, 2010 2:54 PM ET

“PHOENIX (AP) – The Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office has arrested 36 people in a crime and immigration sweep, and six are suspected to be illegal immigrants.

Everyone arrested was stopped for traffic violations. The six suspected illegal immigrants were arrested on charges of failure to provide identification and eventually will be turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to be deported.

The arrests came after about 180 deputies and trained sheriff’s volunteers fanned out across metropolitan Phoenix on Thursday and Friday targeting traffic violators who may also be illegal immigrants.”

This is so fucking bullshit.  A fucking police force fanning across a metropolitan street, seemingly breaking some of the restrictions put on the SB 1070 by a federal judge.  People without identification getting sent to ICE to be deported?  Something better be done, fast.  I’m sure this will make national news.  Wow.  Please share your comments if you can, and feel free to subscribe to my RSS feed or by e-mail.

On Further Research:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/7920386/Arizona-defiant-over-immigration-law.html

Mr Pearce last week pledged to take his battle against undocumented foreigners from the predominantly Hispanic barrios of western Phoenix to the marble steps of the United States Supreme Court, after a federal judge blocked the law’s strictest provisions.

“We are circling the wagons against the illegal immigrants who are responsible for a crime wave in our state and stealing our jobs,” he declared defiantly in an interview with The Sunday Telegraph. Adding a lawman’s metaphor to his cowboy comparisons, he added: “The handcuffs are coming out.”

And Mr Pearce escalated the explosive debate by calling for children born in the US to be denied citizenship if their parents are there illegally. That attack on “birthright” citizenship would require a change to the constitution, but has growing support among conservatives.

The judge’s partial injunction suspended a requirement on police to check individuals’ immigration status during routine stops if they were suspected of being in the US illegally – and Jan Brewer, Arizona’s Republican governor, filed an immediate appeal against it.

So it really looks like the Arizona police forces are doing what they were prohibited from doing.  What a shame… I expected better from a state government.

Engineering grad returns to Mexico, now waits to become legal – CNN.com.

Magdalena De Kino, Mexico (CNN) — Oscar Vazquez will likely read this story. He has the internet. He has a television, too. Then, he’ll go off to work at a car parts factory.

He buries himself in work in this small Mexican town to keep his mind off thoughts of his wife and young daughter back in the United States.

“I try to keep myself busy,” Vazquez said. “Like weekends are really tough. Most days, I just go to work and come home and sleep and sleep as much as I can and go back to work.”

It’s not the life Vazquez thought he’d be living after earning a mechanical engineering degree at Arizona State University.

Across the border, Vazquez’s wife, Karla, and 2-year-old daughter, Samantha, live in Phoenix, Arizona, where it’s relatively safer.

Karla Vazquez said she would have moved to Mexico with her husband if not for Samantha.

Like many Mexican border towns, Magdalena De Kino has seen its share of violence. A few months back several men were shot and killed just down the street, Oscar Vazquez said. The bullets scarred the front of his house.

“That happened before I moved in,” he said. “But it’s still a little scary to have a bullet hole in your front door.”

Every few weeks, Karla and Samantha make the three-hour drive to visit Oscar on Karla’s days off.

“The only thing that worries me is that she drives kind of fast,” Vazquez said, with a frown, during one of the visits.

“I just want to get here,” she interjected.

Magdalena De Kino is a far cry from the life Vazquez lived in Phoenix. When he was in high school, he was an executive officer in the ROTC program.

He was also a member of the robotics team, which entered an underwater remotely operated robot in a competition against universities.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology was one of them.

The little robot called “Stinky” — built in a couple of days by Vazquez and his teammates — won the competition.

But behind all his successes, he was hiding a secret. Vazquez was an illegal immigrant. But not by choice.

When he was 12, his mother smuggled him across the border into Arizona so they could be with his father.

He graduated from high school and college in Arizona, and started a family.

Then Oscar and Karla decided to take an extraordinary risk: He would leave the United States. In essence, Oscar Vazquez would “self deport” to Mexico so he then could apply to return legally.

“No one is going to hire you for a top job if you don’t have your Social Security number and all that stuff,” Vazquez said.

It was the only way to have a successful future in the United States, according to Karla Vazquez.

“He worked so hard to get a degree and really wanted to put it to use,” she said. “He wasn’t going to be able to do that without getting legalized.”

The Vazquezes thought the process would be smooth. He applied for a waiver of his “excludability” based on extreme hardship to his family.

His initial application was rejected.

The U.S. government wanted to see more documents of the family’s finances as well as evidence of the psychological impact of Vazquez’s absence on the family, to prove hardship.

“Do they want to see me living in a box with my baby for it to be enough for them to let my husband come back home?” Karla asked.

“Do they want to see me lose my job and then my child to protective services because I can’t provide for her? What more do they need?”

It could be another year before there’s a decision on his appeal.

How does that make him feel?

“Frustrated,” Oscar says, “not to be with the family, not to be able to see my daughter grow up.”

When he graduated from Arizona State last year, Vazquez was asked to stand during the commencement to be honored for his outstanding perseverance and determination. Hundreds of people applauded him, including President Obama, who was there to deliver the commencement address.

For now, Vazquez lives with those memories and his hope for the future.

“I do want to be able to go back home and give them all the things they need and all the things they want and give them the life they deserve,” he said.

To Oscar: You Rock!  You shouldn’t have to even think about leaving your family behind.  I’m so sorry that this has happened to you and your family.  Better days will be here for all of us, I just hope that it is not too late for you to enjoy your daughters childhood.

This is the type of bullshit that comes out of creating laws against people that live in your community that are not doing any more harm than anyone else.  It’s bullshit that Arizona State University can issue these degrees, and that he can even meet President Obama in his commencement, but has to virtually self-deport because he’s scared shitless that when America deports him, he’ll have no chance to see his daughter again.  How is it possible that a state can issue these degrees, seemingly understanding that he was probably illegal, and then create a law that targets people like him specifically?  It makes me sick.

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21 Good Reason to Risk Deportation for the DREAM Act – Desert, Science and Hot Dogs: The Three Sonorans.

21 immigrant youth are holding sit-ins in congressional offices on Capitol Hill, risking arrest and deportation in order to draw attention to the DREAM Act, which would grant them a path to citizenship. These are their dreams – dreams that to them are well worth the risk.

Laura came to America as a 1 year old baby on Independence Day. Since then, she has finished high school, graduated from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and become an advocate for her right to contribute to the country.

Dulce has a degree in Electrical Engineering and is a licensed realtor. She wants to start a think tank and a talent tank to resolve the world’s global issues. She says, “These are my dreams. I cannot live in political limbo for the rest of my life.”

Jose: “My mother is suffering from kidney failure. Every day she is a little closer to death. She needs the DREAM Act to allow me to be free and work. It is with this sense of urgency that I call on this nation to listen to the real voices of undocumented youth fighting for a lifeline for our families.”

Lulu: “I refuse to accept that I will never see my family again. I refuse to believe that change is not possible. I am an undocumented student and I refuse to be silenced. Today, I am fighting for my right to be free and truly be happy.”

Uriel: “When we fail to speak up, when we fail to criticize, when we fail to stand up for our ideals, and when we fail to improve the lives of those around us; it is a far greater blow to the freedom, the decency, and to the justice which truly represents this nation we call home.”

David: “The memories I have of Mexico do not feel like they are mine. They don’t feel like mine because they are from a place that is completely strange to me.”

These are just an example of the people who are protesting to become citizens of the United States, and forever leave behind an ‘Undocumented’ and ‘illegal’ status.  There are 21 great examples, of which I have provided a few to you here to check this out.

The funny thing about all of this is that these are people who have worked their asses off in and for the American system, both contributing intellectually and physically to our economy and culture every single day.  Some of these people are paying and attending classes to advance in our country, working like mules just to get a good paying job, and ultimately living up to the ever-distant ‘legal’ status and likewise, THE AMERICAN DREAM.

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